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Schizophrenia Medication


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    Schizophrenia effects most people throughout their lifespan. However, it most commonly starts to appear in older teens. Children and older adults usually do not develop schizophrenia, but on occasions it does happen.* The peak of diagnosis is between 16 to 25 years of age.*

    Men and women are effected differently with this mental illness. Males usually tend to have more issues with social withdrawal and substance abuse problems. Women usually have more mood and depressive symptoms. Catching or diagnosing this mental illness early is critical. Sever problems can develop as a person ages if left untreated. The right medication helps. For instance, Ten years after initial diagnosis, approximately 50% of people diagnosed with schizophrenia are either completely recovered or improved to the point of being able to function independently.* 25% are improved, but require a strong support network.* Below is a list of schizophrenia drugs and side effects that may be helpful to you.

Schizophrenia Medication TYPE1

Anti­psychotic medications generally work by blocking a specific subtype of the dopamine receptor, D2 receptor.* Older, type 1, antipsychotics block the D2 receptor to improve positive symptoms of schizophrenia.* These antipsychotic medications also block other D2 receptors which usually worsen negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Some Medications include: chlorpromazine, haloperidol, trifluoperazine, perphenazine and fluphenazine.*

Schizophrenia Medication TYPE 2

The second generation of antipsychotic medications block D2 receptors but in addition block a specific subtype of serotonin receptor too, 5HT2A receptor.*

This combined action in blocking the D2 and 5HT2A receptors treats both the positive and the negative symptoms.* Results will vary in from individual to individual.

Please keep in mind anti­psychotic medications do not work immediately. It might take weeks to see any benefits. Also, side effects tend to occur before improvement occurs, if improvement occurs at all.* Please consult with a doctor if you experience any side effects. Some Medications include: clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, paliperidone and ziprasidone.*

First Generation

Second Generation

Some Side effects

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Blurry vision
  • Dry mouthRapid heartbeat
  • Sensitivity to the sun
  • Skin rash
  • Enlarged breasts
  • Weight gain
  • Sexual problems
  • Restlessness
  • Dry mouth
  • Low blood pressure - etc...

Conclusion

Schizophrenia medication can be helpful when used properly as prescribed. Only use these drugs if prescribed and monitored by a doctor. Again it cannot be stressed enough, the drugs should be monitored by a doctor. They are very strong and can negatively alter brain chemicals effecting a persons thoughts and behaviors if used improperly. *Consult with your doctor about using these drugs*

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*National institutes of health. 2020.  Why sex differences in schizophrenia? Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5688947/

*Gulf  bend center. 2020. Outcomes and recovery factors of schizophrenia. Retrieved from https://www.gulfbend.org/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=8806&cn=7

*Here to help. 2020. Mental Health. Retrieved from https://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/visions/medications-vol4/how-antidepressant-and-antipsychotic-medications-work

James Pino

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  • Cheryl Tromley says:

    Thank you for sharing this information. My younger brother Joey, is a fraternal twin and was diagnosed with schizophrenia when he was in his mid-fourties.He was very introverted but via the internet, he developed many relationships.He was highly intelligent and had a huge heart.His twin brother, Edmund, is the same in his drive to always learn and meet new people. Ed is extroverted, also having a huge heart, is physically fit and healthy.
    Joey passed away October 2019 of liver failure.We don’t know how this happened.He lived in an assisted living facility and had medical care administered daily.He was admitted on a Friday, first time to be diagnosed with liver failure and in three days passed away.The medical staff was unaware of any signs of liver disease during the eight years they cared for him.He lived a clean life with only an occasional cigar or specialty beer at family gatherings.
    I have asked and told by a few physicians that the liver disease may have been caused by the medications for his schizophrenia.I have also been told some anxiety and antidepressants should be monitored for liver and kidney disease.
    I now have all my bloodwork check for any changes in kidney and liver function. Please check with your doctor if your medications can cause damage to your kidneys and liver disease and ask for the bloodwork to be done.

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